The Deviant Moon

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(Source: idonotexcist)

faeryhearts:

Throughout the history of religious art, spiritual beings are often portrayed with wings. In ancient Greece, butterfly-winged figures were personifications of the soul. In ancient Egypt, a birdlike form with outstretched wings was often depicted hovering above the mummy. This was the Ba, the symbol of the life-force, which accompanied the living through life, lived on after death, and could travel the world at will.To wear wings is to experience freedom in all its forms, to move effortlessly through the creative and spiritual realms. A faery’s emotions and thoughts are reflected in the ever-changing light of their wings. Such lights — reflections and refractions — may be read for symbolic meaning. To wear wings is to ally yourself with the Faerie realm. Wings lighten the heart and give the soul flight. Here is the Owl Queen.In the gloaming,she softly shimmers.Always silent,yet leaving a dusting of laughterin her wake.— World of Faerie, by Brian Froud.[Artwork: The Queen of Owls, by Brian Froud.]

faeryhearts:

Throughout the history of religious art, spiritual beings are often portrayed with wings. In ancient Greece, butterfly-winged figures were personifications of the soul. In ancient Egypt, a birdlike form with outstretched wings was often depicted hovering above the mummy. This was the Ba, the symbol of the life-force, which accompanied the living through life, lived on after death, and could travel the world at will.

To wear wings is to experience freedom in all its forms, to move effortlessly through the creative and spiritual realms. A faery’s emotions and thoughts are reflected in the ever-changing light of their wings. Such lights — reflections and refractions — may be read for symbolic meaning. To wear wings is to ally yourself with the Faerie realm. Wings lighten the heart and give the soul flight. Here is the Owl Queen.

In the gloaming,
she softly shimmers.

Always silent,
yet leaving a dusting of laughter
in her wake.

— World of Faerie, by Brian Froud.




[Artwork: The Queen of Owls, by Brian Froud.]

(Source: alexadestiny)

theonlymagicleftisart:

Concept Illustrations by Simon Goinard

Also on Behance.

fer1972:

Today’s Classic: Bad Girls and Bat Wings

1. Albert-Joseph Pénot, Bat Woman (1890)

2. Jószef Arpád Koppay, Lion and Woman with Devil Bat Wings Chained Together (unknown)

3. Johann Heinrich Füssli, The Mad Kate (1807)

4. Gabriel Ferrier, Moonlit Dreams (1874)

5. Vasily Kotarbinsky, Dark Star (date unkwown)

Jun 8

Richard Dawkins should know it pays to believe in fairy tales - Telegraph

!!!!

Jun 8

Grimms' fairy tales podcasts

animationactivist:

Journey Back to Oz (1972)

by Hal Sutherland

Approximate Run Time: 88 minutes

nathanielemmett:

Fan art of Le cirque des Rêves (the Circus of Dreams) from The Night Circus.

nathanielemmett:

Fan art of Le cirque des Rêves (the Circus of Dreams) from The Night Circus.

lovedyouatonce-onceuponadream:

disneyineveryway:

mickeyandcompany:

Sleeping Beauty (1959) and Maleficent (2014)

perf

I HAVE BEEN WAITING MY WHOLE LIFE FOR THIS MOVIE

May 9

How to tell you're reading a gothic novel – in pictures

Gothic novels: The laws of the land are brazenly flouted

Gothic novels: People talk funnyGothic novels: So which Gothic novels are the best?

May 8
The Secret World of arrietty

(Source: amy-box)

May 7

ohbender:

Tove Jansson’s illustrations for Alice in Wonderland

These are beautiful!

May 7

tehscaley:

vmagazine:

20 Disney’s Atlantis Facts (You may or may not know)

  1. After Hunchback of Notre Dame was released, Disney decided they didn’t want to do another musical.  Instead, they chose to do an Action-Adventure film inspired by the works of Jules Verne.
  2. The weaponry used is correct to the time period of early 20th century.  The film features the Lee Enflied, the Lewis Gun, the Broomhandle Mauser and a variant of the Luger.
  3. The creation of the Atlantean language was done by the same man who developed the Klingon language for the Star Trek films.
  4. The filmmakers became interested in the readings of  Edgar Cayce and decided to incorporate some of his ideas. (Edgar Cayce is an American psychic who allegedly possessed the ability to answer questions on subjects as varied as healing, reincarnation, wars, Atlantis and future events while in a trance.)
  5. Vinnie’s last name “Santorini” is actually the name of an ancient chain of volcanic islands in the Mediterranean (probably explains his obsession with explosives).
  6. They utilized all three Disney Animation studies, employing 250 animators, artist and technicians.
  7. The Crew actually traveled 800 feet underground in New Mexico’s Carlsbad Cavern to view subterranean trails, which they used as the base model for the movie.
  8. A Japanese anime film “Nadia: The Secret of Blue Water” and “Atlantis: The Lost Empire” were both inspired by the novel “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea”.
  9. American comic book artist Mike Mignola creator of the series Hellboy worked on the film.
  10. Joss Whedon was the first writer involved with the film.  Whedon is bet known as the creator of the television series “Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Angel, Firefly and Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and also directed Marvel’s The Avengers.
  11. Because the movie was planned as an Action-Adventure, the production crew made up t-shirts that read, “ATLANTIS” - fewer songs, more explosions.
  12. The final scene was created by combining many 24 inch (61cm) pieces of paper.  Each piece was carefully drawn and combined with animated vehicles flying across the scene.  The entire piece reaches an equivalent of an 18,000 inch (457.2 m)  piece of paper that the camera slowly pulled away from.

Read the full article via pbpills

'Atlantis: The Lost Empire' & 'Atlantis: Milo's Return are currently streaming on Netflix / pictures©Disney

Reblogging for an amazing yer underrated Disney movie.