The Deviant Moon

RSS

brainpickings.org

Zelda Fitzgerald’s Little-Known Art

by

From Alice in Wonderland to Times Square, a delicate dance of the imagination.

fairytalemood:

"Snow White" - Fairy Fatales series by Brian Cummings

fairytalemood:

YA Retellings brought to you by Epic Reads - Fairy Tale Retellings:

Beauty and the Beast: East by Edith Pattou / Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow by Jessica Day George / Rose Daughter by Robin McKinley / Cruel Beauty by Rosamund Hodge / Spirited by Nancy Holder / Heart’s Blood by Juliet Marillier / The Princess and the Hound by Mette Ivie Harrison / Stung by Bethany Wiggins / The Hollow Kingdom by Clare B. Dunkle / Beastly by Alex Flinn / Beauty by Robin McKinley / Of Beast and Beauty by Stacey Jay

The Little Mermaid: September Girls by Bennett Madison / Fathomless by Jackson Pearce / Monstrous Beauty by Elizabeth Fama / Midnight Pearls by Cameron Dokey / Mermaid: A Twist on a Classic Tale by Carolyn Turgeon

Cinderella: Just Ella by Margaret Peterson Haddix / Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine / Princess of Glass by Jessica Day George / Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas / If I have A Wicked Stepmother, Where’s My Prince? by Melissa Kantor / Gilded Ashes by Rosamund Hodge / Shadows on the Moon by Zoe Marriott / Cinder by Marissa Meyer / Before Midnight by Cameron Dokey / Ash by Malinda Lo

Rumpelstiltskin: A Curse As Dark As Gold by Elizabeth C. Bunce / Spinners by Donna Jo Napoli / The Crimson Thread by Suzanne Weyn

The Frog Prince: Cloaked by Alex Flinn / Enchanted by Alethea Kontis / The Door in the Hedge by Robin McKinley / Water Song by Suzanne Weyn

The Snow Queen: Cold Spell by Jackson Pearce / Winter’s Child by Cameron Dokey / Stork by Wendy Delsol

Little Red Riding Hood: Red Riding Hood by Sarah Blakley-Cartwright / Scarlet by Marissa Meyer / The Book of Lost Things by John Connolly / Sisters Red by Jackson Pearce / Scarlet Moon by Debbie Viguié / Dust City by Robert Paul Weston

Twelve Dancing Princesses: Entwined by Heather Dixon / The Phoenix Dance by Dia Calhoun / The Night Dance by Suzanne Weyn / Princess of the Midnight Ball by Jessica Day George / Wildwood Dancing by Juliet Marillier

Hansel and Gretel: Sweetly by Jackson Pearce / Bewitching by Alex Flinn / Greta and the Goblin King by Chloe Jacobs

Rapunzel: Bitter Greens by Kate Forsyth / Rapunzel Untangled by Cindy C. Bennett / Towering by Alex Flinn / Cress by Marissa Meyer / Golden by Cameron Dokey / Zel by Donna Jo Napoli

Snow White: Beauty by Nancy Ohlin / Snow by Tracy Lynn / The Glass Casket by McCormick Templeman / The Rose and the Beast by Francesca Lia Block / The Serpent’s Shadow by Mercedes Lackey / Nameless by Lili St. Crow / Fairest by Gail Carson Levine / Tender Morsels by Margo Lanagan (*this is actually a retelling of “Snow White and Rose Red”) / Devoured by Amanda Marrone

Sleeping Beauty: A Kiss in Time by Alex Flinn / Briar Rose by Jane Yolen / Beauty Sleep by Cameron Dokey / Princess of Thorns by Stacey Jay / The Healer’s Apprentice by Melanie Dickerson / Spindle’s End by Robin McKinley / Kill Me Softly by Sarah Cross / A Long, Long Sleep by Anna Sheehan

Philip Pullman's Grimm Tales: An Immersive Fairytale for Young and Old review – 'Instagram theatre'

Grimm Tales theatre Little Red Riding Hood

smirkwoodforest:

Arwen and Aragon

smirkwoodforest:

Arwen and Aragon

(Source: mordork1)

0negirlarmy:

GOD LOOK AT THIS PERFECTION

(Source: teenagers-life-dreams)

faeryhearts:

Once upon a time in the middle of Winter, when the flakes of snow were falling like feathers from the sky, a queen was sitting doing her needlework. As she worked, from time to time she would glance up to see the snow falling outside and, because she did so, she accidentally pricked her finger with her needle. Because the three drops of blood that fell from her finger looked so very beautiful upon the snow, the queen murmured to herself the following thought: “I would love to have a little girl with skin as white as the snow and lips as red as this blood and hair as black as the blackest raven in the Winter sky.”The queen’s wish was to come true, for soon after that the queen gave birth to a little baby girl. Sadly, however, this good and gracious queen drew her last breath just after the child was born. The baby who was left behind was just as her mother had wished her to be: a princess with skin as white as snow, raven-black hair, and with rosy-red cheeks and lips; and she was therefore called Snow White.— Snow White, by Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm.[Artwork by Trina Schart Hyman.]

faeryhearts:

Once upon a time in the middle of Winter, when the flakes of snow were falling like feathers from the sky, a queen was sitting doing her needlework. As she worked, from time to time she would glance up to see the snow falling outside and, because she did so, she accidentally pricked her finger with her needle. Because the three drops of blood that fell from her finger looked so very beautiful upon the snow, the queen murmured to herself the following thought: “I would love to have a little girl with skin as white as the snow and lips as red as this blood and hair as black as the blackest raven in the Winter sky.”

The queen’s wish was to come true, for soon after that the queen gave birth to a little baby girl. Sadly, however, this good and gracious queen drew her last breath just after the child was born. The baby who was left behind was just as her mother had wished her to be: a princess with skin as white as snow, raven-black hair, and with rosy-red cheeks and lips; and she was therefore called Snow White.
— Snow White, by Jacob & Wilhelm Grimm.




[Artwork by Trina Schart Hyman.]

lohrien:

Illustrations by Maja Lindberg

The value of Grimm’s fairytales

In relating their collected fairy tales the Grimm brothers sought the purity of straightforward narration. They kept close to the original story, adding nothing of circumstance or trait. One of the brothers said: “Our first care was faithfulness to the truth. We strove to penetrate into the wild forests of our ancestors, listening to their noble language, watching their pure customs, recognizing their ancient freedom and hearty faith.” Their aim was to preserve ancient wisdom which, during their lifetime, was still alive among some of the old people. The scientific age had come in full swing and many people had little or no understanding of those “old, superstitious and untrue tales.” The Grimm brothers thought differently, and when they listened to old Frau Viehmannin, the wife of a cowherd, who told her stories with great exactness and no variations in repetitions, they penetrated into the imaginative dream world of a child and experienced the healthy, original strength that is inborn in these stories. They realized the educational value of the stories, and learned to read between the lines.
Luckily today we have passed that period of educational decline when fairy tales were banned from the schoolrooms and the homes of intellectuals. At least fairy tales are accepted today as a means of entertainment—”leaving a substantial by-product which has a moral significance.” They are accepted today as a simple form of literature and thus have become again an everyday nourishment for many children.

Rudolf Steiner inspired teachers to make use of the fairy tale in a much deeper and more extensive way than it had been done heretofore. It is a well-known fart that fairy tales have their origin in the period of humanity’s own childhood, in far-distant times when people lived in a naive dreamlike state of soul, before the unfolding of intellectual capacities. According to the principles of biogenetic law, children pass briefly through the different stages of mankind’s evolution. Children between the ages of four and eight correspond approximately in their development with that period of humanity’s childhood in which fairy tales originated. An unspoiled child absorbs fairy tales during this period of its life, with an eagerness similar to the hunger and intensity with which a baby absorbs its mother’s milk.

I was deeply impressed when I heard of a mother in England who, in line with her honest belief in pure scientific thinking, deprived her little daughter of all fairy tales with the result that the child became seriously ill in spite of all the physical care that was given her, and it was said that the child recovered only on account of the fairy tales which her nurse was finally allowed to tell her.

It is interesting to read that the Grimm brothers advised the mothers to tell only one or two stories at a time because otherwise it would be harmful just as it is harmful to drink too much milk at a time.
See also The Importance of Fairy Tales in a Rudolf Steiner School by Frederick Hiebel, Selected Article} from the Bulletin, Vol. I.

The fact that the contents of the most famous fairy tales are to be found, in one form or another, in legends, mythologies and folk lore of all nations seems to indicate that they all have the same origin. Whether they all came from Central Asia, as some authors claim, is to my mind questionable. I should rather imagine that fairy tales came into being in different localities much in the same way as today various people might relate the same dream. They are imaginative pictures of successive stages of human development and probably were perceived independently in different countries. It is a quite frequent occurrence in the history of inventions that the same idea springs up in different localities simultaneously.

It is easier today for the intellectually trained scientist, to make a technical invention than it is for the intellectually trained poet to create a real fairy tale. Many so-called “fairy tales”, written in modern times, do not deserve this name. It would be more appropriate to call them fanciful tales. The name “fairy tale” deserves to be re-established in its old purity today and not be thought of as a phrase for things that arc not quite true.

People often refer to “the golden age of childhood” or “childhoods paradise”, and with great happiness they like to recall those unspoiled days of paradise. Play in the child’s own created world is a sort of dream, and the dreaming is a manifestation of artistic union with the world about him. But the child in time must part from his paradise so as gradually to awaken to his own self-hood. This process of awakening, this gradual conquest of his own personality, is painted in the most vivid colors in true fairy tales and this is the reason why fairy tales are so much liked by children and make such a deep and lasting impression. Because the fairy tales are imaginative analogies of the inner development of humanity as a whole as well as that of the individual child, they are the best spiritual nourishment a child can possibly receive during the period of transition or awakening.

In ever so many of Grimm’s fairy tales we find a prince and a princess in the center of events. In a great variety of ways the bewitched prince or the enchanted princess is finally set free. The ultimate marriage pictures the conscious union of the two, the prince—the human ego, and the princess— the soul, after many struggles and trials.

In the original edition of Grimm’s fairy tales, the first fairy tale is “The Frog Prince” or “Iron Henry”. I wonder whether this selection was made purposely or whether it came about accidentally. It is one of those stories that lend themselves beautifully to interpretation.
Most fairy tales start with “Once upon a time”—which means it can happen any time to anybody—and many end with the words “and if they have not died since, they are still alive.” Who? The people or the happenings? In “The Frog Prince” it is told that the old king’s youngest daughter played with a golden ball in a forest at the edge of a well. In the first two sentences an atmosphere of dreamlike phantasy is already created, and the youngest, most beautiful princess (no darkness, no evil as yet has spoiled the sunlike soul) plays in her childhood paradise. But one day the golden ball falls on the ground and rolls into the well. As in Richard Wagner’s “Rhinegold” the pure innocent gold of ancient wisdom disappears in the water. The ugly frog takes pity on the princess, but he is not interested in pearls or precious stones for a reward; he wishes to participate in her personal affairs. She promises everything the frog asks for, but runs away as soon as she has recovered the ball. When next day the frog comes to the castle the princess is shocked and frightened, but the old king (the eternal conscience) commands her to fulfill her promise.

It affords a strong will impulse to give up her paradise and unite with the cold, intellectual ego. All at once she flings the frog with all her might against the wall, and a handsome prince stands before her. They are married and live happily ever after.

The fairy tale, “The Wolf and the Seven Kids” pictures the inquisitiveness of the awakening human being. Like little kids that jump about anywhere and everywhere, so the growing child senses his surroundings, without plan or organization. In spite of the warning of the wise, protecting mother goat, the kids Open the door to lie and deceit. They lose their delightful paradise and experience darkness in the wolf’s stomach. Only the smallest one escapes into the clock and thus is saved, and is able to save the others also.

The brave little tailor makes his appearance in a number of Grimm’s fairy tales and is undoubtedly the personification of awakening intellectual cleverness. These few example may suffice to bring out how in fairy tales spiritual truth and its relationship to human development are revealed.

Apr 7
deviantmoon28:

Wow I need to get hold of this!!!

deviantmoon28:

Wow I need to get hold of this!!!

(Source: anarcho-alowisney)

Apr 7

(Source: morbidsilence)

Why we need fairytales: Jeanette Winterson on Oscar Wilde

the Happy Prince illustrationselfish giant oscar wilde

abigaillarson:

New fairytale prints are available in my shop, and there’s free shipping (OMG!) until the 13th! 

abigaillarson:

New fairytale prints are available in my shop, and there’s free shipping (OMG!) until the 13th!