The Deviant Moon

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decepticun:

000027 |  by morozov_vadim_film

decepticun:

000027 by morozov_vadim_film

kriptodepresija:

“I am not sure that I exist, actually. I am all the writers that I have read, all the people that I have met, all the women that I have loved; all the cities I have visited.”

Jorge Luis Borges

theheroheart:

Have some Moriarty, on the side of the demons. Quote is from ‘Good Omens’ by Neil Gaiman.
Pencil, coloured in photoshop with a touchpad. My wrist hurts.
deviantArt.

theheroheart:

Have some Moriarty, on the side of the demons. Quote is from ‘Good Omens’ by Neil Gaiman.

Pencil, coloured in photoshop with a touchpad. My wrist hurts.

deviantArt.


Trippiest blog on Tumblr!

Trippiest blog on Tumblr!

glow-goddess:

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glow-goddess:

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(Source: melisica)

Aug 2

(Source: rooneyymaraa)

(Source: idonotexcist)

faeryhearts:

Throughout the history of religious art, spiritual beings are often portrayed with wings. In ancient Greece, butterfly-winged figures were personifications of the soul. In ancient Egypt, a birdlike form with outstretched wings was often depicted hovering above the mummy. This was the Ba, the symbol of the life-force, which accompanied the living through life, lived on after death, and could travel the world at will.To wear wings is to experience freedom in all its forms, to move effortlessly through the creative and spiritual realms. A faery’s emotions and thoughts are reflected in the ever-changing light of their wings. Such lights — reflections and refractions — may be read for symbolic meaning. To wear wings is to ally yourself with the Faerie realm. Wings lighten the heart and give the soul flight. Here is the Owl Queen.In the gloaming,she softly shimmers.Always silent,yet leaving a dusting of laughterin her wake.— World of Faerie, by Brian Froud.[Artwork: The Queen of Owls, by Brian Froud.]

faeryhearts:

Throughout the history of religious art, spiritual beings are often portrayed with wings. In ancient Greece, butterfly-winged figures were personifications of the soul. In ancient Egypt, a birdlike form with outstretched wings was often depicted hovering above the mummy. This was the Ba, the symbol of the life-force, which accompanied the living through life, lived on after death, and could travel the world at will.

To wear wings is to experience freedom in all its forms, to move effortlessly through the creative and spiritual realms. A faery’s emotions and thoughts are reflected in the ever-changing light of their wings. Such lights — reflections and refractions — may be read for symbolic meaning. To wear wings is to ally yourself with the Faerie realm. Wings lighten the heart and give the soul flight. Here is the Owl Queen.

In the gloaming,
she softly shimmers.

Always silent,
yet leaving a dusting of laughter
in her wake.

— World of Faerie, by Brian Froud.




[Artwork: The Queen of Owls, by Brian Froud.]

(Source: alexadestiny)

theonlymagicleftisart:

Concept Illustrations by Simon Goinard

Also on Behance.

fer1972:

Today’s Classic: Bad Girls and Bat Wings

1. Albert-Joseph Pénot, Bat Woman (1890)

2. Jószef Arpád Koppay, Lion and Woman with Devil Bat Wings Chained Together (unknown)

3. Johann Heinrich Füssli, The Mad Kate (1807)

4. Gabriel Ferrier, Moonlit Dreams (1874)

5. Vasily Kotarbinsky, Dark Star (date unkwown)

Jun 8

Richard Dawkins should know it pays to believe in fairy tales - Telegraph

!!!!

Jun 8

Grimms' fairy tales podcasts

animationactivist:

Journey Back to Oz (1972)

by Hal Sutherland

Approximate Run Time: 88 minutes